Vlog – WUCC Preview, Amsterdam Hex Clinic, AO Allstars NA Tour

Amsterdam Hex Clinic sign-up: https://goo.gl/forms/3i6Z8ltURTiZnOaU2
Facebook NED Hex clinic event: https://www.facebook.com/events/18784…

More info on WUCC at http://www.wucc2018.com

Kept the video short and had some technical issues with my new machine, otherwise would’ve loved to have mentioned how great Reading look heading into Worlds, and how I’m looking forward to seeing SMOG (and perhaps some other teams) bring out some Hex! If you see any being played, send me the link!

Follow the games I’ll be working production on live by subscribing to Fanseat – http://www.fanseat.com

Ultimate Skills Project – Felix Highlights & “Catching” Module Intro

Introduction to the module on Catching which will be available at http://www.ultyresults.com – plus a little bit about myself.

Full blog post here: https://www.ultyresults.com/blog/how-to-improve-your-catching-in-any-situation

Analysis: Turnovers from Clapham v Chevron (Galaxy Point)

Analysis of the 5 turnovers in Galaxy Point between Clapham and Chevron, the final of Open Tour 1. Full game footage from this and many other great Tour games is available only at fanseat.com

How to play Hex: Maintaining Shape (analysis of Outbreak Mountain)

Excerpt:

Full stream / extended analysis video:

Review: TOKAY cleats / boots

Quick analysis: Inward pivoting, & stack’s influence on technique

Talking about inward pivoting, the influence that playing stack offences has had on our techniques and habits, plus some info about live streamed analysis which is coming soon!

Analysis: Japan’s bizzare short-field defence pull play against USA & Colony

Brief analysis on Japan’s bizzare tactic of not chasing down the pull on defence.

Flow point at Uni Nationals 2018 + brief analysis

Quick analysis: Japan’s defensive flash-poach

Japan with some brief poaching against USA in the final of the World Championships in 2016.

… read transcript …

Transcript:

In this video I’m going to look at the Japan-USA World Championships final from 2016 – specifically the Japanese defence for one particular point. They do some interesting stuff – it’s not the very advanced switching defence they do that I’ve looked at in other videos and articles, but they do do some interesting things nonetheless. I noticed it whilst watching and thought I would make a quick video to look a bit closer. Enjoy!

First look at #22’s movement after his mark releases the disc.

He has moved downfield and created separation, narrowing the crossfield throwing channel.

Now watch #97’s movement after the disc is released.

Significant separation is created. Again, watch the next defender’s movement after Beau releases the disc.

He moves downfield quickly and tries to cause some trouble for the offence, distancing himself from Beau in the backfield. But wait, it looks like Beau is marked by somebody else now? How did that happen? Keep your eye on these two.

You can see it was not an actual switch – it was just an illusion caused by the movement of the Japanese defenders. At this point the flow stops and there’s an immediate pick, so let’s rewind a little.

Here is the defender that ends up appearing to mark Beau. You can see he leaves his mark – Cassidy Rasmussen – whilst staying super-aware of everything that’s going on around him, covering Beau to help his team mate. He keeps an eye on Rasmussen so he’s able to close him down quickly when he becomes a threat again.

This movement by the Japan defenders is so repetitive that I believe it’s a specific tactic they are employing. In the conventional style of ultimate, the first few seconds of the stall count are almost always spent looking for a positive-yards throw. By overloading this area early in the stall count, Japan are attempting to counter this offensive trend, knowing it’s unlikely USA will throw backwards immediately.

In this point, Cassidy Rasmussen finishes the offence off with some clever footwork – but later in the game the tactic did cause a turnover – one of only three of USA’s turns in the game. If you want to see more analysis on that turnover and the other 8 turns in the game, take a look at the video linked below.

I hope you enjoyed the analysis – I know it wasn’t anything particularly ground-breaking. I think you could describe it as a flash-poach, if you were to use conventional ultimate wisdom & lexicon to describe it. I hope you got something from it, and enjoyed watching a point from that game, which is a brilliant game which I recommend you check out in full – I’ll be looking at other points of this game in the future. Subscribe and like if you want to see more!

Quick Analysis: Failed switch in the AUDL

Quick analysis of a failed switch by San Francisco vs Seattle in this AUDL match from week 16, 2017.